24
Mar
10

Where will the jobs be in the future?

While some people take their time choosing a job or career based on their passions or goals, others just want to know where they can get a job and when.

During the economic downturn, it was difficult to be picky, but now that things are looking up, the abundance of jobs from which to choose should continue to get better with each passing year.

Total employment is expected to increase by 15.3 million jobs during the 2008-18 decade, according to the most recent employment projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Job openings from replacement needs (when workers retire or otherwise leave their jobs) are projected to be more than double the number of openings due to economic growth.

Interested in getting in on the new job action? Here are the 20 jobs that will add the most workers in 2008-2018, according to the BLS.

1. Registered nurses
2008 employment: 2.62 million
2018 employment: 3.2 million
Minimum education or training: Associate degree

2. Home health aides
2008 employment: 922,000
2018 employment: 1.38 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

3. Customer service representatives
2008 employment: 2.25 million
2018 employment: 2.65 million
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training

4. Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food
2008 employment: 2.7 million
2018 employment: 3.09 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

5. Personal and home care aides
2008 employment: 817,000
2018 employment: 1.19 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

6. Retail salespeople
2008 employment: 4.49 million
2018 employment: 4.86 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

7. Office clerks, general
2008 employment: 3.02 million
2018 employment: 3.38 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

8. Accountants and auditors
2008 employment: 1.29 million
2018 employment: 1.57 million
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree

9. Nursing aides, orderlies and attendants
2008 employment: 1.47 million
2018 employment: 1.75 million
Minimum education or training: Post-secondary vocational award

10. Post-secondary teachers
2008 employment: 1.69 million
2018 employment: 1.96 million
Minimum education or training: Doctoral degree

11. Construction laborers
2008 employment: 1.25 million
2018 employment: 1.5 million
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training

12. Elementary school teachers, except special education
2008 employment: 1.55 million
2018 employment: 1.79 million
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree

13. Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer
2008 employment: 1.79 million
2018 employment: 2.03 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

14. Landscaping and groundskeeping workers
2008 employment: 1.21 million
2018 employment: 1.42 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

15. Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks
2008 employment: 2.06 million
2018 employment: 2.28 million
Minimum education or training: Moderate-term on-the-job training

16. Executive secretaries and administrative assistants
2008 employment: 1.59 million
2018 employment: 1.79 million
Minimum education or training: Work experience in a related occupation

17. Management analysts
2008 employment: 747,000
2018 employment: 925,000
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s or higher degree, plus work experience

18. Computer applications software engineers
2008 employment: 515,000
2018 employment: 690,000
Minimum education or training: Bachelor’s degree

19. Receptionists and information clerks
2008 employment: 1.14 million
2018 employment: 1.32 million
Minimum education or training: Short-term on-the-job training

20. Carpenters
2008 employment: 1.28 million
2018 employment: 1.45 million
Minimum education or training: Long-term on-the-job training

Advertisements

0 Responses to “Where will the jobs be in the future?”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: